Public Policy Initiatives

From Grief to Action supports the following initiatives:

Community Action Initiative

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http://www.communityactioninitiative.ca/2012/05/who-weve-helped-so-far-and-our-latest-applicants/?utm_source=Community+Action+Initiative+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=c9cb13afd8-CAI_Blog_Update5_28_2012&utm_medium=email
Description

Funded through a $10 million grant by the Province of B.C., CAI provides grants for sound and leading-edge projects that are planned, led and implemented through community partnerships.

The initiative aims to take a localized, collaborative approach to helping those affected by mental health and substance use issues in B.C. To accomplish this, the CAI creates networks and encourages dialogue between community mental health and substance use organizations around the province.

The Community Action Initiative represents a varied cross-section of interest and experience in mental health/illness and substance use.

Our collective expertise stems from lived experience, research, advocacy, volunteer and work practice. Our members are drawn from community social services, business, labour, government, Aboriginal leadership agencies, and representatives from the BC Alliance for Mental Health/Illness and Addiction.

 

 


Exciting training program for addiction medicine specialists announced

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http://www.helpstpauls.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Fellowship-for-change.pdf
Description

Thanks to a generous endowment from Goldcorp, St. Paul’s Hospital has been able to establish a new teaching program for addiction specialists. No resource is more critical to the continuum of health care without which addicted youth are unlikely to achieve their potential in life.


First, Do No Harm: Prescription Drug Strategy for Canada’s Next Decade

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http://fgta.ca/docs/0-First_Do_No_Harm__Responding_to_Canada%E2%80%99s_Prescription_Drug_Crisis_-_Canada-Strategy-Prescription-Drug-Misuse-Report-en.pdf
Description

The Canadian Council on Drug Abuse has worked with Health Canada to address the national crisis in prescription drug abuse and has published this ten-year strategy for prevention and intervention.


Four Pillars Coalition

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http://vancouver.ca/people-programs/four-pillars-drug-strategy.aspx
Description

The Four Pillars Drug Strategy is the City of Vancouver’s policy and plan for reducing drug-related harm in Vancouver.  The website offers many resources such as the podcasts selected for this FGTA page.  It also reports harm reduction efforts Canada-wide.


Getting to Tomorrow: Canadian Drug Policy Coalition Report

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http://www.fgta.ca/docs/0-CDPC2013_en.pdf
Description

From the report’s introduction:

“The findings of this report, based on interviews with change-makers and service providers and [on] scans of important documents and research, reveal that Canada is at a crossroads when it comes to drug laws and policies. A new direction in drug policy is required. We can continue to work within the paradigm of drug prohibition or we can begin to explore alternative approaches and chart a new course that can help save lives, respect human rights and be more cost effective.”


Harm Reduction for Communities

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http://www.fgta.ca/docs/0-hrcommunityguide.pdf
Description

Harm reduction: what it is, what a community program does, and how to develop a program. 


Harm Reduction Practices Centred on Women

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http://www.fgta.ca/docs/0-Women-centredHarmReduction.pdf
Description

A dedicated Canadian community of decision-makers, direct service providers, educators, NGO leaders, policy analysts, and researchers is ever engaged in preventing and mitigating addiction harm. To these individuals we are indebted for our National Framework for Action to Reduce the Harms Associated with Alcohol and other Drugs and Substances in Canada.

          In 2009 a national virtual Community of Practice (vCoP) provided the opportunity for a “virtual discussion” of issues, research, and programming related to girls’ and women’s substance use in the country. The aim of the discussion was to “gender” the national framework.

          This discussion guide highlights one of the topics explored in the vCoP. Its purpose is to stimulate further conversation on gendered approaches to prevention, harm reduction, and treatment.

          The Community of Practice project was sponsored by the British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health (BCCEWH) in partnership with the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) and the Universities of Saskatchewan and South Australia.


Healthy Minds, Healthy People.

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http://www.fgta.ca/docs/0-healthy_minds_healthy_people_10-year_mental_health_for_BC.pdf
Description

British Columbia’s health authorities jointly administer services to individuals with an addiction disorder and those with a mental disorder. This is the province’s ten-year plan for these education, diagnosis and treatment services.


Housing — the Fifth Pillar of Harm Reduction

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http://www.heretohelp.bc.ca/visions/housing-vol8/the-fifth-pillar-housing
Description

This article reports what some FGTA member families have witnessed when their sons or daughters have been struggling with an addiction, or were on the road to recovery, and especially needed the stability and safety that sound housing affords. At certain times, the health of someone in recovery depends also on a high standard of built-in support services. Is the supply of “recovery housing” managed responsibly in BC?


Improving Services for Severe Addiction and Mental Illness in British Columbia 2013

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http://www.fgta.ca/docs/0-improving-severe-addiction-and-mental-illness-services.pdf
Description

This is the action plan announced by the Ministry of Health on November 21, 2013.


International Perspective on Harm Reduction

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http://www.fgta.ca/docs/0-Harm_Reduction_Speech.doc
Description

The families of people with an addiction disorder will appreciate the wisdom expressed in April by Craig McClure, Executive Director, International AIDS Society. Mr. McClure gave the closing keynote address  to the International Harm Reduction Conference (Harm Reduction 2009) in Bangkok, Thailand, this past April 23.

 


Learning from Each Other (Harm Reduction study)

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http://www.fgta.ca/docs/0-Learning_From_Each_Other-Harm_Reduction.pdf
Description

Learning From Each Other: Enhancing Community-Based Harm Reduction Programs and Practices in Canada is the final report on the research undertaken by the Canadian Harm Reduction Network and the Canadian AIDS Society on useful and innovative harm reduction programs and practices in nine small-to-medium-sized cities in Canada … and some of the ways that challenges to them are being met. The report draws on information from focus groups with people who use services in these cities, agency visits and community walk-abouts, and is illustrated with photographs taken en route


Mental Health Commission of Canada

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http://www.mentalhealthcommission.ca/english/pages/default.aspx
Description

Youth, peer support (for parents and others) and “a room of one’s own” are all news and activity areas represented on this  website, in the newsletter, and in other publications from Canada’s Mental Health Commission.


Mothering and Substance Abuse

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http://www.fgta.ca/docs/0-MotheringandSubstanceUse.pdf
Description

A dedicated Canadian community of decision-makers, direct service providers, educators, NGO leaders, policy analysts, and researchers is ever engaged in preventing and mitigating addiction harm. To these individuals we are indebted for our National Framework for Action to Reduce the Harms Associated with Alcohol and other Drugs and Substances in Canada.

          In 2009 a national virtual Community of Practice (vCoP) provided the opportunity for a “virtual discussion” of issues, research, and programming related to girls’ and women’s substance use in the country. The aim of the discussion was to “gender” the national framework. 

          This discussion guide highlights one of the topics explored in the vCoP. Its purpose is to stimulate further conversation on addressing the needs of pregnant women and mothers in substance use prevention, harm reduction, treatment, service system planning, and policy making.

          The Community of Practice project was sponsored by the British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health (BCCEWH) in partnership with the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) and the Universities of Saskatchewan and South Australia. 


Public policy directions 2012

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http://www.fgta.ca/docs/0-Public_policy_directions_for_legislators.pdf
Description

The Board of FGTA has created a statement of the most pressing issues that government has the capacity to resolve in order to relieve unfair burdens on the families of people with an addiction disorder or concurrent disorders. The four key messages from FGTA are here in this document.


Still Waiting: First-hand Experiences with Youth Mental Health Services in B.C.

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http://www.fgta.ca/docs/0-RCY-CYMHreport-Apr2013.pdf
Description

This report comes from British Columbia’s Representative for Children and Youth, Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond. Its subject is the immediately pre-adult age group. However, from FGTA’s standpoint, it describes deficiencies experienced by families at all stages of their children’s development.

The calls on the provincial government to address urgent needs for direct mental health services in B.C., describing a fragmented and under-resourced system of services for youth ages 16 to their 19th birthday.


What does it cost to ignore youth substance abuse?

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http://www.fgta.ca/docs/0-2012-ccsa-Investing-in-youth-substance-abuse-prevention-en.pdf
Description

This study, A Case for Investing in Youth Substance Abuse Prevention, brings together the answers to questions that are important to Canadians as taxpayers and as community members who cherish young people:

1. Are drugs and alcohol especially toxic for individuals aged 12-24, and does the consumption pattern for that age range affect the risk?

2. What do the ill effects of substance abuse cost Canada in lost productivity, the spoils of crime, chronic illness, burdens on the justice system, and other outcomes?