Academic Research

A mobile phone application for the assessment and management of youth mental health problems in primary care

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Scientifically Based Approaches to Drug Addiction Treatment

Annual Report 2012-2013, Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse
CCSA is the acknowledged authority on substance abuse, the research that investigates its causes and control (and the reasons for control) and the policies in place for prevention and remediation of the harms from drugs and alcohol.

Investing in Youth Substance Abuse Prevention

2013 Fact Sheet on Ecstasy
The Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse gathers together statistics on rates of non-medical drug use in Canada and other countries and, from time to time, publishes a new summary. This one reflects the self-reported behaviour of Canadians surveyed in 2009.

Getting to Tomorrow – A Report on Canadian Drug Policy
From the report’s introduction:
“The findings of this report, based on interviews with change-makers and service providers and [on] scans of important documents and research, reveal that Canada is at a crossroads when it comes to drug laws and policies. A new direction in drug policy is required. We can continue to work within the paradigm of drug prohibition or we can begin to explore alternative approaches and chart a new course that can help save lives, respect human rights and be more cost effective.”

Girl-Centred Approaches to Prevention, Harm Reduction, and Treatment
A dedicated Canadian community of decision-makers, direct service providers, educators, NGO leaders, policy analysts, and researchers is ever engaged in preventing and mitigating addiction harm. To these individuals we are indebted for our National Framework for Action to Reduce the Harms Associated with Alcohol and other Drugs and Substances in Canada.

In 2009 a national virtual Community of Practice (vCoP) provided the opportunity for a “virtual discussion” of issues, research, and programming related to girls’ and women’s substance use in the country. The aim of the discussion was to “gender” the national framework.

This discussion guide highlights one of the topics explored in the vCoP. Its purpose is to stimulate further conversation on gendered approaches to youth prevention, harm reduction, and treatment.

The Community of Practice project was sponsored by the British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health (BCCEWH) in partnership with the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) and the Universities of Saskatchewan and South Australia.

The At Home/Chez Soi Project
The Mental Health Commission undertook projects in Canada’s major cities to determine how persons with a mental disorder fared when guaranteed secure housing.
This report examines how members of the Vancouver site mobilized research, housing, and service provider teams to recruit, house and support participants in the At Home/Chez Soi project. It describes the strengths of the local team and the challenges they faced as they implemented all aspects of the project from October 2009 to January 2011. This report also includes a Key Messages document and an Executive Summary at the beginning.

Physician Education in Addiction Medicine
A Canadian thought leader and researcher joins with counterparts in the United States to connect the dots between preparing physicians to treat youth addiction and reducing a nation’s incidence of chronic addiction and concurrent disorders. Dr. Evan Woods of UBC and St. Paul’s Hospital published this article in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association.

New Study of Youth and Crystal Meth
Findings from a British Columbia study of young crystal meth users and the activities that have a high statistical association with first use of crystal methamphetamines (e.g., living on the street).

Mothering and Substance Use: Approaches to Prevention, Harm Reduction, and Treatment
A dedicated Canadian community of decision-makers, direct service providers, educators, NGO leaders, policy analysts, and researchers is ever engaged in preventing and mitigating addiction harm. To these individuals we are indebted for our National Framework for Action to Reduce the Harms Associated with Alcohol and other Drugs and Substances in Canada.

In 2009 a national virtual Community of Practice (vCoP) provided the opportunity for a “virtual discussion” of issues, research, and programming related to girls’ and women’s substance use in the country. The aim of the discussion was to “gender” the national framework.

This discussion guide highlights one of the topics explored in the vCoP. Its purpose is to stimulate further conversation on gendered approaches to youth prevention, harm reduction, and treatment.

The Community of Practice project was sponsored by the British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health (BCCEWH) in partnership with the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) and the Universities of Saskatchewan and South Australia.

First-Hand Experiences with Youth Mental Health Services in B.C. (April 2013)

Trauma-Informed Approaches in Addictions Treatment

Women-Centered Harm Reduction
A dedicated Canadian community of decision-makers, direct service providers, educators, NGO leaders, policy analysts, and researchers is ever engaged in preventing and mitigating addiction harm. To these individuals we are indebted for our National Framework for Action to Reduce the Harms Associated with Alcohol and other Drugs and Substances in Canada.

In 2009 a national virtual Community of Practice (vCoP) provided the opportunity for a “virtual discussion” of issues, research, and programming related to girls’ and women’s substance use in the country. The aim of the discussion was to “gender” the national framework.

This discussion guide highlights one of the topics explored in the vCoP. Its purpose is to stimulate further conversation on gendered approaches to youth prevention, harm reduction, and treatment.

The Community of Practice project was sponsored by the British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health (BCCEWH) in partnership with the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) and the Universities of Saskatchewan and South Australia.

Principles of Effective Treatment